[W] observe that this dispute has consumed an inordinate amount of time, energy, and resources — judicial and otherwise. The salutary purpose of the Right-to-Know Law — to “ensure both the greatest possible public access to the actions, discussions and records of all public bodies, and their accountability to the people,” RSA 91-A:1 — is best served when the members of the public and the governmental bodies are guided by a spirit of collaboration. We take this opportunity to encourage all public bodies, and members of the public making Right-to-Know requests, to embrace that spirit, and work together to efficiently and effectively resolve disputes involving RSA chapter 91-A. 

Part I, Article 8 of the N.H. Constitution says:

All power residing originally in, and being derived from, the people, all the magistrates and officers of government are their substitutes and agents, and at all time accountable to them. Government, therefore, should be open, accessible, accountable and responsive. To that end, the public’s right of access to governmental proceedings and records shall not be unreasonably restricted.

Section 1 of RSA Chapter 91-A reflects this purpose when it states:

Openness in the conduct of public business is essential to a democratic society. The purpose of this chapter is to ensure both the greatest possible public access to the actions, discussions and records of all public bodies, and their accountability to the people.

.https://www.nh.gov/osi/planning/resources/conferences/spring-2015/documents/right-to-know-law-session-materials.pdf

[Art.] 8. [Accountability of Magistrates and Officers; Public’s Right to Know.] All power residing originally in, and being derived from, the people, all the magistrates and officers of government are their substitutes and agents, and at all times accountable to them.  Government, therefore, should be open, accessible, accountable and responsive.  To that end, the public’s right of access to governmental proceedings and records shall not be unreasonably restricted.  The public also has a right to an orderly, lawful, and accountable government.  Therefore, any individual taxpayer eligible to vote in the State, shall have standing to petition the Superior Court to declare whether the State or political subdivision in which the taxpayer resides has spent, or has approved spending, public funds in violation of a law, ordinance, or constitutional provision.  In such a case, the taxpayer shall not have to demonstrate that his or her personal rights were impaired or prejudiced beyond his or her status as a taxpayer.  However, this right shall not apply when the challenged governmental action is the subject of a judicial or administrative decision from which there is a right of appeal by statute or otherwise by the parties to that proceeding.
June 2, 1784

Amended 1976 by providing right of access to governmental proceedings and records.
Amended 2018 by providing that taxpayers have standing to bring actions against the government

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